Category Archives: Science

The Isabelle Prover IDE after 9 years of development, and beyond

On Mon 24-Jul-2017, I gave a presentation at the BigProof event in Cambridge. Title: The Isabelle Prover IDE (PIDE) after 9 years of development, and beyond. Abstract:

The main ideas around Isabelle/PIDE go back to summer 2008. This is an overview of what has been achieved in the past 9 years, with some prospects for the future. Where can we go from here as Isabelle community? (E.g. towards alternative front-ends like Visual Studio Code; remote prover sessions “in the cloud”; support for collaborative editing of large formal libraries.) Where can we go as greater ITP community (Lean, Coq, HOL family)?

Here are some notable VSCode projects that were briefly mentioned in the talk:

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Isabelle/PIDE as IDE for ML

On Friday 18-Nov-2016 10:00, I will give a presentation about PIDE at Laboratoire de Recherche en Informatique, Orsay (Paris Sud).

Abstract:

Isabelle is usually positioned as environment for interactive and automated theorem proving, but its Prover IDE (PIDE) may be used for regular program development as well. Standard ML is particularly important here, since it is the bootstrap language of Isabelle/ML (i.e. SML with many add-ons) and Isabelle/Pure (i.e. the logical framework).

The ML IDE functionality of Isabelle + Poly/ML is manifold:

  • Continuous feedback from static analysis and semantic evaluation is already available for years, e.g. Isabelle2014 (August 2014). It is a corollary of how PIDE interaction works, and of the integration of the Poly/ML compiler into that framework. Source files are statically checked and semantically evaluated while the user is editing. The annotated sources contain markup about inferred types, references to defining positions of items etc.
  • Source-level debugging within the IDE is new in Poly/ML 5.6, which is bundled with Isabelle2016 (February 2016). The Prover IDE provides the Debugger dockable to connect to running ML threads, inspect the stack frame with local ML bindings, and evaluate ML expressions in a particular run-time context. See also here.
  • IDE support for the Isabelle/Pure bootstrap process is new technology for the coming release of Isabelle2016-1 (December 2016). The ROOT.ML file acts like a quasi-theory in the context of theory ML_Bootstrap: this allows continuous checking of all loaded ML files. The theory file is presented with a modified header to import Pure from the running Isabelle instance.
  • It is also possible to modify standalone SML projects, to edit the sources freely in the ML IDE. For example, MetiTarski can participate after some trivial changes of its ROOT.ML file.

Overall, we move more and more to an integrated framework for development of formal-reasoning tools, but other applications are admissible as well.

The Slides are available, together with their sources (which are required for the live system demo).

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Isabelle/PIDE — from Interactive Theorem Proving to Integrated Theorem Proving

On Tuesday 15-Nov-2016 14:00, I will give a presentation about PIDE at Laboratoire Spécification et Vérification, Cachan (Paris). See also the official announcement.

Abstract:

Interactive theorem proving was historically tied to the read-eval-print loop, with sequential and synchronous evaluation of prover commands given on the command-line. This user-interface technology was adequate when Robin Milner introduced his LCF proof assistant in the 1970s, but today it severely restricts the potential of multicore hardware and advanced IDE front-ends.

The Isabelle Prover IDE breaks this loop and retrofits the read-eval-print phases into an asynchronous model of document-oriented proof processing. Instead of feeding a sequence of commands into the prover process, the primary interface works via edits over immutable document versions. Execution is implicit and managed by the prover in a timeless and stateless manner, making adequate use of parallel hardware.

PIDE document content consists of the theory sources (with dependencies via theory imports), and auxiliary source files of arbitrary user-defined format: this allows to integrate other languages than Isabelle/Isar into the IDE. A notable application is the Isabelle/ML IDE, which can be also applied to the system itself, to support interactive bootstrapping of the Isabelle/Pure implementation.

Further tool integration works via “asynchronous print functions” that operate on already checked theory sources. Thus long-running or potentially non-terminating processes may provide spontaneous feedback while the user is editing. Applications range from traditional proof state output (which often consumes substantial run-time) to automated provers and dis-provers that report on existing proof document content (e.g. Sledgehammer, Nitpick, Quickcheck in Isabelle/HOL). It is also possible to integrate “query operations” via additional GUI panels with separate input and output (e.g. for manual Sledgehammer invocation or find-theorems).

Thus the Prover IDE orchestrates a suite of tools that help the user to write proofs. In particular, the classic distinction of ATP and ITP is overcome in this emerging paradigm of Integrated Theorem Proving.

The Slides are available.

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Grant Olney Passmore on Formal Verification of Financial Algorithms

On 25-Aug-2016, Grant Olney Passmore from Aesthetic Integration gave an invited talk at the ITP 2016 conference in Nancy, France. Here is the official announcement from the program:

Title: Formal Verification of Financial Algorithms, Progress and Prospects

Abstract:
Many deep issues plaguing today’s financial markets are symptoms of a fundamental problem: The complexity of algorithms underlying modern finance has significantly outpaced the power of traditional tools used to design and regulate them. At Aesthetic Integration, we’ve pioneered the use of formal verification for analysing the safety and fairness of financial algorithms. With a focus on financial infrastructure (e.g., the matching logics of exchanges and dark pools), we’ll describe the landscape, and illustrate our Imandra formal verification system on a number of real-world examples. We’ll sketch many open problems and future directions along the way.

The session chair introduced the speaker as a colleague from the prover community who managed to get his private life covered by the NY Times.

Passmore then started his presentation with a promotional video, which is intended for people from the Financial Industry – without a background in formal logic or software verification. He pointed out that this is his first talk about the subject before an audience with expertise in theorem proving, and promised that many odd terms and buzzwords from the world of Finance would become clear later.

From his many slides, Passmore could fit only a small portion into the 60min time slot. A key point was the following Stack of Financial Algorithms (from top to bottom):

  • Collateral Trading
  • Inventory Management
  • Algo Containers
  • Trading Algorithms
  • Smart Order Routers
  • Venues

So far, Aesthetic Integration has mainly worked at the bottom: “Venues” are virtual places where trading happens, e.g. a “dark pool” as in the UBS Future of Finance Challenge (see also the white paper).

Passmore invited the prover community to participate in formal treatment of the whole stack given above. For example, full formalization of Financial Mathematics in Isabelle/HOL could support the slot “Trading Algorithms”.

He also presented the present flagship tool environment: Imandra. Here is a quotation from the official website:

What is Imandra?

AI’s Imandra is breakthrough artificial intelligence technology for ensuring financial algorithms are designed and implemented safely and fairly.

Powered by major recent advances in formal verification, Imandra:

  • Verifies correctness and stability of system designs for regulatory compliance
  • Uncovers nontrivial bugs
  • Tests – creates high-coverage test-suites
  • Saves – radically reduces associated costs

The system was demonstrated in two versions: one running on the local machine, and one running on a server (i.e. “in the cloud”). The interaction model is still mainly command-line based, but Aesthetics Integration is interested to improve on that.

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The Isar proof language in 2016

At the Isabelle Workshop 2016 in Nancy, I presented a paper about recent renovations of the Isar proof language:

This is a description of the Isar proof language as it stands today in 2016. This means the official release Isabelle2016 (February 2016), and the next release that is presumably published towards the end of the year. Relevant NEWS entries and updated portions from the Isabelle/Isar Reference Manual are summarized in one comprehensive article.

See also the full paper and the slides.

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Intelligible semi-automatic reasoning in December 2015

A presentation on old and new aspects of Isabelle/Isar will happen 04-Dec-2015 10:00 at Univ. Bonn (Workgroup of Prof. Koepke). See also the web page of Oberseminar mathematische Logik.

Abstract:

Isabelle was introduced in 1989 (by L. Paulson) as a generic logical framework for higher-order natural deduction. Intelligible semi-automated reasoning (Isar) was introduced in 1999 (by M. Wenzel) as a structured proof language for human-readable formal proof documents. Today, in December 2015, we see large applications of Isabelle/Isar in the Isabelle/HOL object-logic, e.g. in the Archive of Formal Proofs with more than 240 entries.

After so many years, development of Isar is still not finished. Recent refinements of old concepts and additions of new concepts include: structured rule statements (Eigen-contexts), multi-branch elimination (case-splitting), structured backwards refinement. The new Eisbach language (by D. Matichuk et al) allows to define complex proof methods in their usual syntax, instead of traditional Isabelle/ML. Sledgehammer (by J. Blanchette et al) allows to generate semi-intelligible Isar proofs from machine-generated proofs (via external ATPs and SMTs).

The ultimate aim of Isabelle/Isar is to turn the results of formal proof production into mathematical documents with nice type-setting. Document source was mainly written in LaTeX in the past, but is now moving towards Markdown, with specific GUI support in the Prover IDE (Isabelle/jEdit).

The Slides are available.

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HOL4 workshop at CADE-25

The HOL4 workshop will happen on Sunday 02-Aug-2015 and Monday 03-Aug-2015 in Berlin, as an associated event of the 25th International Conference on Automated Deduction (CADE-25). The main theme are future directions and visions on HOL4 development: both users and developers are invited to participate in the discussion.

Even though I am myself not an HOL4 person, I will give a presentation about Isabelle/PIDE/jEdit as integrated development environment for Standard ML. The abstract is as follows:

After more than 7 years of development, Isabelle/PIDE/jEdit is today the standard way to interact with that particular proof assistant. In Isabelle2015 (May 2015) the TTY-based REPL and its wrapper for Proof General / Emacs have already been dismantled. This radical move might be taken as an opportunity of the HOL4 community to attract former Isabelle users who really do want to use plain TTY interaction. Or as an opportunity to discuss possibilities for HOL4 users and developers to make their own moves towards full-scale IDE support.

As a very modest start, I would like to present various possibilities of Isabelle/PIDE to operate as IDE for Standard ML, which happens to be the underlying language platform of HOL4 as well. This touches various facilities of Poly/ML that David Matthews provides specifically to tool builders: run-time compiler invocation with IDE feedback, toplevel environment management, structured toplevel printing (with markup and hyperlinks), and potentially also run-time debugging of SML (still unused in Isabelle2015).

Beyond that it is also possible to integrate any other languages that are related or unrelated to the prover platform, using PIDE libraries either on the ML or Scala side of that IDE framework.

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Isabelle Tutorial at CADE-25

A full-day tutorial on Isabelle will happen Saturday 01-Aug-2015 in Berlin, as an associated event of the 25th International Conference on Automated Deduction (CADE-25). Here is some further organizational information about tutorials at CADE-25. Important materials for the tutorial are available at the bottom of this post.

More than 25 years ago, Isabelle was initiated by Larry Paulson as a logical framework for rapid prototyping of Natural-Deduction proof systems. Today, Isabelle is one of the major platforms for Interactive Theorem Proving (ITP), with notable support for automated reasoning tools (ATPs and SMTs). Isabelle/HOL is the main environment for applications; it is accompanied by the Archive of Formal Proofs (AFP) as repository for user-contributions. Isabelle supports logical tool development in Isabelle/ML and Isabelle/Scala, but it is also possible to connect external tools; this works routinely on Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X. The system presents itself to the end-user by an advanced Prover IDE: Isabelle/jEdit.

The purpose of the tutorial is to get acquainted with Isabelle, using the latest release Isabelle2015 (May 2015). Topics cover specifications in HOL, proofs in Isar, use of automated provers via Sledgehammer etc. The target audience are doctoral students or researchers with an interest in formalized reasoning, application of reasoning tools for interactive and automated proof development, maybe even with an interest to develop their own tools with/for Isabelle.

There will be presentations by Makarius Wenzel and Christian Sternagel, with hands-on tutoring and exercises done by the participants on their own computers (at least 2 cores and 4 GB memory).

Materials

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