Category Archives: PIDE

Scaling Isabelle Proof Document Processing

Isabelle applications (e.g. from AFP) are growing steadily in size and number. To outline requirements and possibilities of the technology, I have produced a document on Scaling Isabelle Proof Document Processing.

Abstract:

This is a study of performance requirements, technological side-conditions, and possibilities for scaling of formal proof document processing in Isabelle and The Archive of Formal Proofs (AFP). The approaches range from simple changes of system parameters and basic system programming with standard APIs to more ambitious reforms of Isabelle and the underlying Poly/ML system. The running examples for typical scalability issues are existing formalizations of classical analysis and differential equations. Such applications can be further extrapolated towards a development of Financial Mathematics (e.g. Itô calculus).

Flattr this!

Future Prospects of Isabelle Technology

On 23-Nov-2017, I will give a presentation about Future Prospects of Isabelle Technology at DTU (Danmarks Tekniske Universitet), Copenhagen – thanks to an invitation by Jørgen Villadsen. More information on the meeting is available on the website.

Abstract:

In the past 3 decades, Isabelle has made a long way from a modest LCF-style proof assistant (with copy-paste of proof scripts written in ML) to the current Isabelle/PIDE editor-environment (with its timeless and stateless processing of proof documents). In this presentation, I will try to extrapolate this into the future: How far can we scale proof documents and libraries, e.g. via moving Isabelle into the “cloud”? How can we reduce system resource requirements on the client side? How can we upgrade interactive edits produced by a single author, towards versioned changesets by multiple or distributed authors? What are suitable frameworks for the next generation of Isabelle document preparation? What can we make out of Isabelle/ML as ultra-clean environment for functional programming? Etc. etc.

Sources for the presentation: Copenhagen2017.tar.gz

Flattr this!

Isabelle/VSCode 1.0 in Isabelle2017

The new Isabelle2017 release includes support for VSCode as alternative Prover IDE front-end. This continues earlier experiments and is released as Isabelle/VSCode 1.0. Note that Isabelle/jEdit had its 1.0 release in October 2011 and is presently at version 9.0.

Isabelle2017 provides the main Isabelle/Scala/PIDE functionality to connect to VSCode, using the official Language Server Protocol (with some PIDE add-ons). The front-end requires the extension called “Isabelle2017” from the VSCode marketplace: its README provides more information and installation instructions.

The Isabelle/VSCode project has been made possible thanks to funding by Aesthetic Integration (Grant Passmore and Denis Ignatovich).

Flattr this!

The Isabelle Prover IDE after 9 years of development, and beyond

On Mon 24-Jul-2017, I gave a presentation at the BigProof event in Cambridge. Title: The Isabelle Prover IDE (PIDE) after 9 years of development, and beyond. Abstract:

The main ideas around Isabelle/PIDE go back to summer 2008. This is an overview of what has been achieved in the past 9 years, with some prospects for the future. Where can we go from here as Isabelle community? (E.g. towards alternative front-ends like Visual Studio Code; remote prover sessions “in the cloud”; support for collaborative editing of large formal libraries.) Where can we go as greater ITP community (Lean, Coq, HOL family)?

Here are some notable VSCode projects that were briefly mentioned in the talk:

Flattr this!

Visual Studio Code as Prover IDE for Isabelle

Microsoft is more and more becoming an Open Source company, e.g. it has joined the Linux foundation as Platinum member in November 2016. A notable Open Source project by Microsoft is Visual Studio Code: under the slogans “Code editing. Redefined. Free. Open Source. Runs everywhere.” it provides a very interesting editor framework, as a desktop application based on Node.js and TypeScript.

The prover community has already started to support this emerging successor of vi and Emacs, e.g. see Coq Support for Visual Studio Code and the Lean for VSCode.

Isabelle/VSCode is now following this trend: I have spent some weeks in December 2016 / January 2017 with VSCode, using a little bit of TypeScript and implementing the new Language Server Protocol in Isabelle/Scala. The subsequent screenshot shows formal annotations produced by Isabelle/PIDE in the usual manner, while the editor rendering is all done by VSCode. For more information, see the report Isabelle/VSCode in January 2017.

The Isabelle/VSCode project was funded by Aesthetic Integration (AI). See also my article about a talk at ITP 2016 by Grant Passmore (co-founder of AI).

Flattr this!

Isabelle/PIDE as IDE for ML

On Friday 18-Nov-2016 10:00, I will give a presentation about PIDE at Laboratoire de Recherche en Informatique, Orsay (Paris Sud).

Abstract:

Isabelle is usually positioned as environment for interactive and automated theorem proving, but its Prover IDE (PIDE) may be used for regular program development as well. Standard ML is particularly important here, since it is the bootstrap language of Isabelle/ML (i.e. SML with many add-ons) and Isabelle/Pure (i.e. the logical framework).

The ML IDE functionality of Isabelle + Poly/ML is manifold:

  • Continuous feedback from static analysis and semantic evaluation is already available for years, e.g. Isabelle2014 (August 2014). It is a corollary of how PIDE interaction works, and of the integration of the Poly/ML compiler into that framework. Source files are statically checked and semantically evaluated while the user is editing. The annotated sources contain markup about inferred types, references to defining positions of items etc.
  • Source-level debugging within the IDE is new in Poly/ML 5.6, which is bundled with Isabelle2016 (February 2016). The Prover IDE provides the Debugger dockable to connect to running ML threads, inspect the stack frame with local ML bindings, and evaluate ML expressions in a particular run-time context. See also here.
  • IDE support for the Isabelle/Pure bootstrap process is new technology for the coming release of Isabelle2016-1 (December 2016). The ROOT.ML file acts like a quasi-theory in the context of theory ML_Bootstrap: this allows continuous checking of all loaded ML files. The theory file is presented with a modified header to import Pure from the running Isabelle instance.
  • It is also possible to modify standalone SML projects, to edit the sources freely in the ML IDE. For example, MetiTarski can participate after some trivial changes of its ROOT.ML file.

Overall, we move more and more to an integrated framework for development of formal-reasoning tools, but other applications are admissible as well.

The Slides are available, together with their sources (which are required for the live system demo).

Flattr this!

Isabelle/PIDE — from Interactive Theorem Proving to Integrated Theorem Proving

On Tuesday 15-Nov-2016 14:00, I will give a presentation about PIDE at Laboratoire Spécification et Vérification, Cachan (Paris). See also the official announcement.

Abstract:

Interactive theorem proving was historically tied to the read-eval-print loop, with sequential and synchronous evaluation of prover commands given on the command-line. This user-interface technology was adequate when Robin Milner introduced his LCF proof assistant in the 1970s, but today it severely restricts the potential of multicore hardware and advanced IDE front-ends.

The Isabelle Prover IDE breaks this loop and retrofits the read-eval-print phases into an asynchronous model of document-oriented proof processing. Instead of feeding a sequence of commands into the prover process, the primary interface works via edits over immutable document versions. Execution is implicit and managed by the prover in a timeless and stateless manner, making adequate use of parallel hardware.

PIDE document content consists of the theory sources (with dependencies via theory imports), and auxiliary source files of arbitrary user-defined format: this allows to integrate other languages than Isabelle/Isar into the IDE. A notable application is the Isabelle/ML IDE, which can be also applied to the system itself, to support interactive bootstrapping of the Isabelle/Pure implementation.

Further tool integration works via “asynchronous print functions” that operate on already checked theory sources. Thus long-running or potentially non-terminating processes may provide spontaneous feedback while the user is editing. Applications range from traditional proof state output (which often consumes substantial run-time) to automated provers and dis-provers that report on existing proof document content (e.g. Sledgehammer, Nitpick, Quickcheck in Isabelle/HOL). It is also possible to integrate “query operations” via additional GUI panels with separate input and output (e.g. for manual Sledgehammer invocation or find-theorems).

Thus the Prover IDE orchestrates a suite of tools that help the user to write proofs. In particular, the classic distinction of ATP and ITP is overcome in this emerging paradigm of Integrated Theorem Proving.

The Slides are available.

Flattr this!

PIDE as Standard ML IDE for bootstrapping Isabelle

Isabelle is usually advertized as environment for interactive and automated theorem proving, but its Prover IDE (PIDE) may be used for regular program development as well. Standard ML is particularly important here, since it is the bootstrap language of Isabelle/ML (i.e. SML with many add-ons) and Isabelle/Pure (i.e. the logical framework).

Using Isabelle/PIDE for bootstrapping Isabelle itself is now possible in recent repository versions, e.g. Isabelle/1c1f8531ca37 – see also README_REPOSITORY for general explanations how to build and run that. Here is the relevant NEWS entry from that version:

IDE support for the Isabelle/Pure bootstrap process. The initial files src/Pure/ROOT0.ML or src/Pure/ROOT.ML may be opened with Isabelle/jEdit: they act like independent quasi-theories in the context of theory ML_Bootstrap. This allows continuous checking of ML files as usual, but results are isolated from the actual Isabelle/Pure that runs the IDE
itself.

The ML project consists of a sequence of ML_file commands in ROOT.ML. Projects other than Isabelle can do the same with SML_file for official Standard ML. Afterwards, the following Poly/ML command line is able to build the project without the IDE: poly --eval "val SML_file = PolyML.use" --use ROOT.ML

What is also notable in the Isabelle/Pure bootstrap environment is the structure Thread_Data for global state variables within the current thread. There are two implementations: (1) physical and (2) virtual. The virtual version is used when Isabelle/Pure is loaded into itself: it allows to manage many versions of the load process with different intermediate states in a value-oriented manner.

Flattr this!

ML debugging within the Prover IDE

Isabelle/ML is based on Poly/ML and thus benefits from the source-level debugger of that implementation of Standard ML. The Prover IDE provides the Debugger dockable to connect to running ML threads, inspect the stack frame with local ML bindings, and evaluate ML expressions in a particular run-time context. A typical debugger session is shown in the screenshot below.

[ML debugger]

ML debugging depends on the following pre-requisites.

  1. ML source needs to be compiled with debugging enabled. This may be controlled for particular chunks of ML sources using any of the subsequent facilities.

    1. The system option ML_debugger as implicit state of the Isabelle process. It may be changed in the menu Plugins / Plugin Options / Isabelle / General. ML modules need to be reloaded and recompiled to pick up that option as intended.
    2. The configuration option ML_debugger, with an attribute of the same name, to update a global or local context (e.g. with the declare command).
    3. Commands that modify ML_debugger state for individual files: ML_file_debug, ML_file_no_debug, SML_file_debug, SML_file_no_debug.

    The instrumentation of ML code for debugging causes minor run-time overhead. ML modules that implement critical system infrastructure may lead to deadlocks or other undefined behaviour, when put under debugger control!

  2. The Debugger panel needs to be active, otherwise the program ignores debugger instrumentation of the compiler and runs unmanaged. It is also possible to start debugging with the panel open, and later undock it, to let the program continue unhindered.

  3. The ML program needs to be stopped at a suitable breakpoint, which may be activated individually or globally as follows.

    For ML sources that have been compiled with debugger support, the IDE visualizes possible breakpoints in the text. A breakpoint may be toggled by pointing accurately with the mouse, with a right-click to activate jEdit’s context menu and its Toggle Breakpoint item. Alternatively, the Break checkbox in the Debugger panel may be enabled to stop ML threads always at the next possible breakpoint.

Note that the state of individual breakpoints gets lost when the coresponding ML source is re-compiled! This may happen unintentionally, e.g. when following hyperlinks into ML modules that have not been loaded into the IDE before.

The debugger panel (see screenshot) shows a list of all threads that are presently stopped. Each thread shows a stack of all function invocations that lead to the current breakpoint at the top.

It is possible to jump between stack positions freely, by clicking on this list. The current situation is displayed in the big output window, as a local ML environment with names and printed values.

ML expressions may be evaluated in the current context by entering snippets of source into the text fields labeled Context and ML, and pushing the Eval button. By default, the source is interpreted as Isabelle/ML with the usual support for antiquotations (like ML, ML_file). Alternatively, strict Standard ML may be enforced via the SML checkbox (like SML_file).

The context for Isabelle/ML is optional, it may evaluate to a value of type theory, Proof.context, Context.generic. Thus the given ML expression (with its antiquotations) may be subject to the intended dynamic run-time context, instead of the static compile-time context.

The buttons labeled Continue, Step, Step over, Step out recommence execution of the program, with different policies concerning nested function invocations. The debugger always moves the cursor within the ML source to the next breakpoint position, and offers new stack frames as before.

Flattr this!

Release of Coq 8.5

On 21-Jan-2016 Coq 8.5 has been released, with an unusually long distance of about 3.5 years to Coq 8.4.

Coq 8.5 is notable for having a little bit of PIDE (Prover IDE) support (by Enrico Tassi), without using that name nor the Scala-based PIDE library of Isabelle. It is all based on OCaml, and connects to the regular CoqIde frontend.

Flattr this!